KeyBank’s Annual Neighbors Make the Difference Day Helps 700 Organizations

COW Header

KeyBank’s Annual Neighbors Make the Difference Day Helps 700 Organizations

CEO Beth Mooney and Pacific Region Sales Executive Carol Nelson joined the KeyBank team to landscape at Dunham Tavern Museum. The Museum is the oldest building still standing on its original site, in Cleveland.

CEO Beth Mooney and Pacific Region Sales Executive Carol Nelson joined the KeyBank team to landscape at Dunham Tavern Museum. The Museum is the oldest building still standing on its original site, in Cleveland.

KeyBank’s 26th Annual Neighbors Make the Difference Day took place May 25, 2016. Nearly 50 percent of bank employees participated in the day of volunteerism, supported by paid time off. Two-thirds of Key’s branches closed at noon, while the remaining stayed open for clients, as employees volunteered at 700 community organizations in the 15 states where Key has a presence.

“Each year, we host Neighbors Make the Difference Day to demonstrate to our neighbors our deep commitment to the community,” said Margot Copeland, CEO and Chair of KeyBank Foundation. “The concept of employee volunteerism and personal service has always been important to KeyBank. I believe we have one of the most caring and active bodies of employees of any corporation. We fully support our employees’ volunteer efforts throughout the year and thank them for their heartfelt service.”

The Key team builds walls for Habitat for Humanity in Columbus, Ohio.

The Key team builds walls for Habitat for Humanity in Columbus, Ohio.

Neighbors Make the Difference Day began in 1991, when a group of KeyBank employees in Alaska volunteered for service projects and gave the day its title. By 1993, the idea had swept across many of the communities Key serves and became an official day of employee volunteerism. It is now the hallmark of Key’s commitment to its communities and a leading corporate volunteerism effort in America.

“Neighbors Make the Difference Day has become a long-standing, cultural tradition at KeyBank,” said Copeland. “Working closely with our communities is in our corporate DNA, and we’ve been proud to watch this day go from a small Alaska effort to a bank-wide initiative.”

Jenny Tang covers young apples with paper bags to protect the fruit from pests at the Danny Woo Community Garden in Seattle, Washington. City Fruit helps protect heritage fruit trees, harvest the tree’s fruit, and then deliver it to food banks.

Jenny Tang covers young apples with paper bags to protect the fruit from pests at the Danny Woo Community Garden in Seattle, Washington. City Fruit helps protect heritage fruit trees, harvest the tree’s fruit, and then deliver it to food banks.

Congratulations KeyBank!